Community Art Projects

September 6, 2015

I have volunteered the last 2 Saturdays with a local mental health charity, last week I led a workshop that involved decorating masks, but this week I was able to take more of a back seat and make some of my own art along with others who use the services. The Art Psychotherapist that ran this week’s group got us to focus on the theme of Aboriginal Art. Indigenous Australian art or Australian Aboriginal art is art made by the Indigenous peoples of Australia and in collaborations between Indigenous Australians and others. It includes works in a wide range of media including painting on leaves, wood carving, rock carving, sculpting, ceremonial clothing and sand painting. We used cotton buds to create our own dot paintings, I enjoyed building up layers with dots and using both bright and earthy colours together.



Here are some masks that I made to bring to last week’s session as an example. I used both fabrics, wires and paper mâché to give the masks more interesting shape and movement.



Transference and Dreams

April 4, 2015

_MG_1799_MG_1800 _MG_1811 _MG_1810 I began these drawings a few weeks ago, beginning with wet paper and adding inks to make feathery and spidery effects (later adding watercolour). I was inspired after visiting the Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden exhibition at the Tate Modern; her amazing ink drawings pinned together on the gallery wall. As I had recently been working in ink, I appreciated her fluid use of this diverse and unpredictable material. I found the image below from the exhibition on the Guardian website. The concept for my own drawings is the idea of transference; the projection of intense and difficult emotions, an experience which can be unavoidable when working in mental health. I imagined these images, and used colour combinations to show intense emotional states. The faces are dreamlike and not unlike masks, symbolising the metaphorical façades that others give us; projecting unconscious feelings and past unresolved relationships. Marlene Dumas retrospective, Tate Modern, London, Britain - 03 Feb 2015 I have also been working on concertina sketchbooks, enjoying the long and flowing format that can be stretched out or folded away in a swift movement. The images below show sketchbooks using inks and watercolours, as well as collage and acrylic paint. I began the watercolour sketchbook by working in pencil, drawing from postcards of brain tissue, neurones and CT brain scans, mixing these with my own patterns. The acrylic and collage sketchbook continues the idea of surreal dream imagery; both sketchbooks work as visual mind landscapes. _MG_1808 _MG_1806 _MG_1804 _MG_1803 _MG_1802 _MG_1814 _MG_1813 _MG_1812 _MG_1815